Hepatitis Laboratory

 

Hepatitis is one of the major public health diseases in the world. An estimated of 2 billion people globally has been infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), with approximately 240 millions suffered chronic hepatitis B – most of which live in East / South-East Asia or Africa. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect up to 150 million people worldwide. In addition, there are also sporadic cases of hepatitis A and hepatitis E, which may amount to about 20 million cases every year. Chronic hepatitis patients carry the potential risks of developing advanced liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. It has been reported that clinical complications of viral hepatitis infection cause as many as 1.5 million deaths annually.

 

Routes of transmission for viral hepatitis depend on the type of the virus, with hepatitis A and E commonly spread by contaminated food or water, while hepatitis B, C, and D are passed on by means of direct contact of open wound with contaminated blood or bodily liquid. While hepatitis A and E may cause significant outbreaks, they are usually self-limiting and can be contained by good sanitary and hygiene food-handling. On the other hand, hepatitis B and C in particular, cause the problem of chronicity. In endemic countries in Africa and (South) East Asia such as Indonesia, the major routes of HBV and HCV transmission originated from mother-to-child (vertical) and blood donor or needle-injection (horizontal) transmission.

 

Indonesia is categorized as a moderate-to-highly endemic region for HBV infection with an average prevalence of 9.4%, and it also has a growing incidence rate of hepatitis C (0.05-3.37%). The diversity of ethnic populations in Indonesia in combination with the interactions between pathogen and its host’s genomic and phenotypic make up, Indonesia provides a wealth of data for studies in hepatitis, especially hepatitis B and C. The Hepatitis Laboratory of Eijkman Institute investigates multiple aspects of this disease, including its epidemiology, virology, diagnostic and clinical implications, as well as public health importance in various populations such as blood donors, healthy asymptomatic individuals, and clinical patients.

�s genomic and phenotypic make up, Indonesiaprovides a wealth of data for studies in hepatitis, especially hepatitis B and C. The Hepatitis Laboratory of Eijkman Institute investigates multiple aspects of this disease, including its epidemiology, virology, diagnostic and clinical implications, as well as public health importance in various populations such as blood donors, healthy asymptomatic individuals, and clinical patients.

 

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